Osteopractor takes the prize!  With an overwhelming victory over the other contenders, osteopractor wins easy as the 2013 PT Word of the Year ! Some think Osteopractor has a poor prognosis. This survey proves otherwise.

Thanks for everyone who voted and spread the survey through social media.  There were over 400 votes! Wow, much more than I expected.  Keep ideas in mind for next year as we enter 2014 🙂

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3 comments

  1. Self-voting and self-promotion by those who have taken Dunning’s SMI courses (like yourself) don’t make it relevant despite “word of the year”…check James Dunning’s public humiliation of Physical Therapists and those that disagree with him on Twitter…nice try and no thanks! :/

    1. Hey Matt,
      Thanks for visiting and posting. I am well aware of the actions on twitter this past week. I assure you that even though I have completed the courses through SMI and several of my writing topics are of SMT and information provided to me through courses (hence the logo), I am not affiliated with the institution. This is the same as other bloggers posting logos of MDT, PRI, SFMA, etc. Also, just like everyone else who has taken the courses, the discussion this past week is only related to Dr. Dunning and not my own views/words.

      As for the survey, there was equal opportunity for others to vote for a different “word of the year” for 2013. I even reached out to several of the most active PT tweeters to get their opinion, hence, the other options too. It was not a self-promotion gig & most of my email & twitter followers are not from SMI colleagues…honestly, I do not know many of them.

      The self-promotion may seem that way due to the overwhelming response but not the intention.

      Harrison

  2. What is word of the year? PT word of the year? NAH! Cause DO’s and MD’s can sit for it. Welcome to another field where they infiltrate our profession without the associated training. Osteopractor? More like benefactor to all those who are duped into these courses teaching techniques not supported by APTA’s definition of dry needling. Call it what you will but your definition of DN is flawed. It would be more appropriate to call it IASTM. Just another invented niche to make money. You want DN go to myopainseminars.

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